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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
analyst mr. jim walsh. he joins me here in boston. >> cold boston. >> everyone is asking me, is it that cold in boston? it is. >> you're clearly not a native new englander. you picked a bad spot. >> we're in a wind tunnel. i'll ask you since we are here talking. did the fbi drop the ball in interviewing the older tsarnaev brother? >> i mean at a very simple level, based just on the outcome you would have to say yes. he interviewed him and he went on to commit an act. but i don't think we have the full answer here yet. what was the process that they followed? the fbi interviews a ton of folks every year. only a fraction of which are actually dangerous. they interview me when i go to aroon and north korea and come back. but obviously either they -- he fell through the cracks or at the time that they were interviewing him they weren't giving him anything actionable to continue his case. >> but, lou, he did visit russia, stayed there for six months. you feel the fbi dropped the ball? >> i'm not going to rush to judgment on this. i think we're going to have hearings where directo
to justice. [ cheers and applause ] >> heather: an amazing moment. jim gray is a sportscaster and fox news contributor. jim, what is it about a sporting event that can bring us altogether and allow us all to heal just a little bit, maybe for the moment? >> it's always been an escape. it's a chance to set aside all the problems that go on. it brings the community together. it allows everyone to have a place where they can vent their emotions and try and get away from the realities of life. it's been a great healing in many times of crisis throughout our country's history. >> heather: you've been a sportcast terrify for many years. this was done following 9/11. in the days that followed that, liza minelli and belting out new york, new york. that was september 21st. shoe share some of your reflections and times you remember events have been able to, country has been able to heal due to a sporting event? >> i don't think when president bush took the mound at yankee stadium and he threw out the first pitch. the whole thing had just been a month. it was still so very, very fresh. here the leader
area? >> and there is a study that -- about half of silicon valley tech companies were founded by jim brants -- immigrants and that decreased to 44% in recent years and the company, the immigrants say that is because of the restrictions and the backlog that they face. so, i mean, there is a history. a recent history of jim brants -- immigrants making a big difference in invasion and whether -- in innovation, whether more reeseas would be to more innovation, it's hard to say and generally, hoping for an open system where pomp are -- people are able to come. >> they would like no controls if they had their ways, right in. >> no controls. >> that would be interesting and this is going to be, the tech guys are putting their money into this as well. >> yeah, and those are companies in everyone's lives. facebook, google, instagram even and i think that appeals to the republicans and democrats. and you can see if you listen to any of the congressional hearings the last few weeks, they're always name dropping silicon valley and companies founded by immigrants. >> and that is going to be inter
have a number of reports this morning. to begin we hear from john miller and then jim axel rod. to begin we hear from john miller and then jim axel rod. >> reporter: it was a week of images, both frightening and inspiring. the chaos of a terrorist attack and the heroism of the response. in erie videos from security cameras we saw brothers tamerlan and dzhokhar tsarnaev allegedly on the way to place the bombs. and then the gripping 28-hour manhunt. there was an ambush that left a young police officer dead. and a gun battle that left a transit police officer badly wounded and ended the life of tamerlan tsarnaev. dzhokhar tsarnaev, his younger brother, was lost spotted in this infrared photo hiding inside a boat as the drag net closed in around him. his f.b.i. wanted poster now marked captured is the image that puts to a close the first chapter in the story of the boston marathon bombing. and so the next chapter opens with nothing but questions. questions posed by the president himself. >> why did young men who grew up and studied here as part of our communities and our country re
in and get out. at kathy and jim dougherty's house, several blocks away from the explosion, they came to broken glass and cracks in the ceiling authorities are allowing only some residents to see their homes. >> we're very, very fortunate. lot of people have lost everything. >> reporter: police closest to the worst damage were told overnight it could be another week before they get back in, they're still worried about broken gas pipes causing another deadly explosion. no one here wants to relive this. 14 people were killed. federal investigators are here. they still haven't shared what they think caused the plant to blow. the plant is several streets, several city blocks that way. workers there now, walls around the building are still crumbling and the fire there is still smoldering. they may have to live this way for months. for "good morning america," abc news, steve osunsami west, texas. >>> finally, the moscow circus, gave everyone a scare when he broke through his safety net, crashing to the floor, he got up with only a minor injury, take my word for it. it happened. >> thank you
news." >> axelrod: good evening. i'm jim axelrod.
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
unemployed during the great depression, and you had jim crow where it was legal and de facto segregation. you didn't find the same kind of criminality. we have spent $16 trillion since 1965 on poverty, and what we've done is we've destabilized families. that is why when a kid sees a gang banger, as you mentioned, he looks at that gang banger and thinks, hey, this is what i want to be. he doesn't have a father to say, wait a second, this is not the way to go. hit the books two good, hard hours a day. finish high school, don't have a kid before you're 20 years old and get married before you have that kid. if you do that, you will not be poor. the question we have to ask ourselves is, what policies are we doing that are giving people the incentive or disincentive to follow that formula? >> host: larry elder, a conversation between you and your mother beginning with your mother. your mother thought -- your father thought small. don't make the same mistake. that's unfair. oh, here you go again, defending him. he's not donald trump. he was a wimp, she said. >> guest: yeah. my mother -- she was in a
completely agree. one of the close i found i especially really like was from a former congressman jim kline and he said it's a little hard to believe that your nonfiction book you can't put down. and i thought that it was especially appropriate because if you like this book, it's different from a lot of nonfiction work that i've read. and that it really does read like a thriller. it really does, it takes these little discussions, and jack should manatee, humanity side to it. >> guest: we like to think it's an important book in the sense that it tells you how the court works. there are so few good books out there that explains what's the process, how do they go about this, how do they decide these cases, what are they saying to one another? we see these cases that split the court five before. what do they think? to the personal this get into it? so it's about not just about capital punishment. it's a book about how the court operates. >> guest: when he did get into those in the library of congress, the memorandum, the notes back and forth between the justices that are available him and a lot
keeper. the married love guff, patronizing $1,000 an hour hookers. jim mcgreevey, appointing his gay lover to a public job. at the opposite end is golf champ tiger woods, another married traveler in the wild woman fast lane who, hit bottom. but his dazzling athletic talent made the difference, so he's back winning tournaments again. in this spring season of hope, the comeback spotlight has landed on three hopeful men, all of whom had trouble with extra curricular women. these are the masters of the universe, whose hunger for attention is so enormous that we peons must accept their urchghtuous apologies and reward them with the intrinsically american second chance. anthony weiner is such a man, rawly ambitious, obnoxious with a lean and hungry look of a roman assassin. the new york times sanctioned his comeback effort with an approving profile, featuring his wife, a close assistant to hillary clinton. less than two years ago, mr. weiner, a seven-term congressman from new york, was caught sending lewd messages to young women, along with pictures of his excited self in underwear. logica
vacated by jim benning and one against the candidate and quickly founded the tea party caucus. boss, a group of which i may be the only member, only two times have we hadfa an december ron paul in 2011. the only other father-son team of was mitt romney and his dad, and former gov. george romney. now on to monday and mechanical matters. we are on the record, no live tweeting. c-span has agreed not to use the session for a least one hour. to ask auld like question, do the traditional thing and send me a non thready and signal and i will happily call on one and all. now that he has had to buy its cultural offer our guest the opportunity to make some comments and then move around the table. the floor is yours. >> it sounds like with all of these rules that we're going to create some news this morning. i don't know about that. >> we live in hope. >> as i was going round the room, i was thinking i was in a wedding of receiving line. if anybody feels compelled to send me a wedding gift, it has to be under $14 to meet the senate limit. i was told anything short of 13 hours of speaking would
people on the books, find out who they are. the issueur calls on of boy scouts of america we welcome jim to the conversation from oklahoma. good morning. the gay crowd wants to push how they live on uni. they should be able to decide their own rules and the government should be completely out of it. just like the gay marriage thing. if they want to get married, fine. if a certain church doesn't want to marry them, then so be it. the government should stay out of the whole issue. that's it. host: part of the debate this week on what to do with the alleged bomber involved in the killing of three bostonians over this past week. the headline, republicans want the boston bombing suspect treated as an enemy combatants, sparking miranda debate. key republicans are calling on the obama administration to declare the 19-year-old suspect an enemy combatant subject to the loss of four, so intelligence officials can continue to interrogate him for as long as they deem necessary. authorities captured him in watertown, mass. friday evening. they are invoking the public .afety exception he remains hospi
the period of jim crow. that is our live coverage for today and we hope your life again tomorrow. right now we are going to go to the hancock foundation building and this is where the history panel here at "the los angeles times" festival of books is just beginning. you are watching booktv on c-span2. [inaudible conversations] >> will you let me know when we are supposed to start? [laughter] >> good morning. that is my signal. my name is tim newton on back of "the los angeles times" and i'm pleased to welcome you to the 2013 festival of books. books. more specifically i'm delighted to welcome this morning to today's panel which brings some really remarkable authors to talk about their latest work and the idea behind him. before we get going i have been handed a piece of paper that says it's critically important that i read this. please silence all cell phones and i also need to tell you there is a book signing following the session here the book signing for this panel is in the staging area number one. i am told this is on the festival map and the center of the event program so the office h
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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